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Engineering Human Collecting System Reporter Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines

Key Personnel

Sanjay Jain (PI)
Washington University in St. Louis

  • Bendi Gong
    Washington University in St. Louis
  • Shondra Miller
    Washington University in St. Louis

Project Description

RELATED DATA

We propose to generate modified human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) reporter lines with a genetically encoded activity sensor that tags key cell types important in development and function of the urinary collecting system. We will leverage an existing WTC11 hiPSC line that harbors GCaMP6 as an activity sensor thereby enhancing the functional utility of these lines by superimposing physiology onto development during or after a desired cell type or kidney organoid is formed. Multi-labeled reporter hiPSC cell lines of the collecting system in this proposal will enable RBK members to incorporate this essential component of the kidneys in efforts to optimize nephron formation, patterning and organization in scaffolds with the goal of making a kidney that maintains homeostasis and successfully expels urine.

Publications

  1. A Toolbox to Characterize Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell–Derived Kidney Cell Types and Organoids

    Vanslambrouck, Jessica M.; Wilson, Sean B.; Tan, Ker Sin; Soo, Joanne Y.-C.; Scurr, Michelle; Spijker, H. Siebe; Starks, Lakshi T.; Neilson, Amber; Cui, Xiaoxia; Jain, Sanjay; Little, Melissa Helen; Howden, Sara E.. Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. 30(10):1811–1823. 2019.

    Kidney organoids generated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) show great potential for modeling kidney diseases and studying disease pathogenesis. However, the relative accuracy with which kidney organoids model normal morphogenesis, as well as the maturity and identity of the renal cell types they comprise, remain to be fully investigated. The authors describe the generation and validation of ten fluorescent CRISPR/Cas9 gene-edited iPSC reporter lines specifically designed for the visualization, isolation, and characterization of cell types and states within kidney organoids, and demonstrate the use of these lines for cellular isolation, time-lapse imaging, protocol optimization, and lineage-tracing applications. These tools offer promise for better understanding this model system and its congruence with human kidney morphogenesis.Background The generation of reporter lines for cell identity, lineage, and physiologic state has provided a powerful tool in advancing the dissection of mouse kidney morphogenesis at a molecular level. Although use of this approach is not an option for studying human development in vivo, its application in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is now feasible.Methods We used CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing to generate ten fluorescence reporter iPSC lines designed to identify nephron progenitors, podocytes, proximal and distal nephron, and ureteric epithelium. Directed differentiation to kidney organoids was performed according to published protocols. Using immunofluorescence and live confocal microscopy, flow cytometry, and cell sorting techniques, we investigated organoid patterning and reporter expression characteristics.Results Each iPSC reporter line formed well patterned kidney organoids. All reporter lines showed congruence of endogenous gene and protein expression, enabling isolation and characterization of kidney cell types of interest. We also demonstrated successful application of reporter lines for time-lapse imaging and mouse transplantation experiments.Conclusions We generated, validated, and applied a suite of fluorescence iPSC reporter lines for the study of morphogenesis within human kidney organoids. This fluorescent iPSC reporter toolbox enables the visualization and isolation of key populations in forming kidney organoids, facilitating a range of applications, including cellular isolation, time-lapse imaging, protocol optimization, and lineage-tracing approaches. These tools offer promise for enhancing our understanding of this model system and its correspondence with human kidney morphogenesis.

  2. (Re)Building a Kidney.

    Oxburgh, L; Carroll, TJ; Cleaver, O; Gossett, DR; Hoshizaki, DK; Hubbell, JA; Humphreys, BD; Jain, S; Jensen, J; Kaplan, DL; Kesselman, C; Ketchum, CJ; Little, MH; McMahon, AP; Shankland, SJ; Spence, JR; Valerius, MT; Wertheim, JA; Wessely, O; Zheng, Y; Drummond, IA. J Am Soc Nephrol. 28(5):1370–1378. May 2017.

    (Re)Building a Kidney is a National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases-led consortium to optimize approaches for the isolation, expansion, and differentiation of appropriate kidney cell types and the integration of these cells into complex structures that replicate human kidney function. The ultimate goals of the consortium are two-fold: to develop and implement strategies for in vitro engineering of replacement kidney tissue, and to devise strategies to stimulate regeneration of nephrons in situ to restore failing kidney function. Projects within the consortium will answer fundamental questions regarding human gene expression in the developing kidney, essential signaling crosstalk between distinct cell types of the developing kidney, how to derive the many cell types of the kidney through directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells, which bioengineering or scaffolding strategies have the most potential for kidney tissue formation, and basic parameters of the regenerative response to injury. As these projects progress, the consortium will incorporate systematic investigations in physiologic function of in vitro and in vivo differentiated kidney tissue, strategies for engraftment in experimental animals, and development of therapeutic approaches to activate innate reparative responses.